My kind of spaceship

You’re about to head for a journey through our Solar System and beyond. What fictional spaceship would you like to board? Would it be Millenium Falcon, Battlestar Galactica, USS Enterprise or something completely different?
Nancy Atkinson (Editor at Universe Today, writer for Seeker and author of “Incredible Stories From Space: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Missions Changing Our View of the Cosmos”)

I would like to travel on board a Nova-class starship, which was a type of Federation starship in Star Trek designed for short-term planetary research missions. Instead of studying other worlds from far-away Earth, why not go visit them and study them in situ? Strange new worlds indeed! I might have to wait a while to do this though, as in Star Trek lore, these type of ships will only be placed in service starting in the late 24th century.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

Based purely on sentiment, it would be Serenity, which strikes me as being in spirit much more like a long range spaceship than luxury liners like the Enterprise. That said, all the science fiction spaceships I’ve come across take considerable liberties with physics, astronomy, or both. Douglas Adams’ Heart of Gold gets around all these bothersome realities by exploiting infinite improbability, but that is more unlikely to come about than a Babel Fish.

One fictional spaceship that minimizes these little white lies is Arthur C. Clarke’s Discovery One from 2001 a Space Odyssey. No magical artificial gravity, impossible propulsion, or unnecessary bulk. Of course, you would never get out of the solar system with such a craft.

In the far future, I would envision relatively small interplanetary craft powered by small black holes, with the shielding problems largely solved to allow travel at large fractions of the speed of light. There would be biological organisms aboard such a craft (apart from some hitchhiking bacteria), just uploaded minds that construct for themselves a new, properly adaptive body upon arrival at a destination. Daniel Cartin’s simulations show that you could build a network of colonies in the local solar neighborhood with an 11 parsec range, which seems just doable to a 21st century engineer.

Ciro Villa (technologist, application developer, STEM communicator)

“The Avalon” of the movie “Passengers” is absolutely breathtaking. I wouldn’t mind cruising the Galaxy on that one.

Fraser Cain (publisher at Universetoday.com, co-host of Astronomy Cast)

Personally, I’ve always preferred the Stargate method of travel, using wormholes to voyage from world to world. What could be more convenient and civilized than to walk through a Einstein-Rosen Bridge and arrive at your destination. That’s the only way to go.

Seth Shostak (Senior Astronomer and Director of the Center for SETI Research at SETI Institute)

Enterprise, of course. I like the never-iron uniforms.

Bob Novella (co-founder and vice-president of New England Skeptical Society, co-host of Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe)

Many spaceships in science fiction would do a fine job touring our solar system. Using their Warp or Hyper or U-Space drives, they could visit all planets and even the Oort Cloud a light year away between breakfast and lunch, assuming you preferred just a 3 hour tour 🙂

For the deluxe tour, though, I’d have to take advantage of Time and Relative Dimension in Space, otherwise known as the TARDIS from Dr. Who. This wonderful vessel could of course flit between planets faster than any other vessel… more importantly though, it could turn each planetary visit into a tour de force of our solar system’s evolution.

You could visit each planet and see it evolve from its birth billions of years ago all the way to its ultimate demise: burned to a crisp as the sun dies, dismantled and used as a Dyson swarm component, or if it survives all that, you could discover if it crashes into the sun due to the loss of gravitational wave energy in a quintillion or sextillion years.

When the the tour is done, you could then choose to return a nanosecond after you left. I can’t think of any other ship in science fiction that could do so much in so little objective time (except maybe the Heart of Gold, but I wouldn’t want to see any whales crashing into planets)

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