Exceptional character

There were many great characters in the Sci-Fi genre. Which one in your opinion showed the best values like courage, leadership or integrity? Would it be Commander Adama from Battlestar Galactica, James T. Kirk or Jean-Luc Picard from Star Trek or maybe some other exceptional character?
Terry Virts (Speaker, author, consultant, former Astronaut)

There have been many great leaders in science fiction, but I think at the top of that list is Captain Kirk. He was always decisive, usually made the right decision and lead through some pretty terrible adversity. Once you got past some of the overacting drama he actually dealt with a very pressing and important social issues. He had a multi-racial crew which was unheard of at that time and he dealt with it seamlessly, he just accepted his crew for who they were, without even thinking of their race or even species. He dealt with all of the important political tensions of the day, between the US and the Soviet Union, the race riots in America and all kind of problems. The world could’ve really used a real life leader like Captain Kirk. In fact we could probably use him today, without the overacting 🙂

Mike Mongo (Author, astronaut teacher, science communicator)

For my money, there is no better leader in the myriad of science fiction universes than Buckaroo Banzai. In addition to good genes, a talent for conceptual physics, and the superlative focus and nerve of brain surgeons–as well as the moxie to lead a New Jersey bar band–Buckaroo Banzai knows his way around multiple dimensions, interplanetary existential crisis, and even bad puns. But above and beyond all this, there is one quality which makes Buckaroo Banzai a great character is Banzai’s natural good luck. Good luck is the earmark of all exceptional characters from science fiction and Buckaroo Banzai exemplifies it.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

Well, o course Dr. Who comes to mind at once, but one of my favorite protagonists is Terry Pratchett’s Discworld witch, Granny Weatherwax. She is brave, wise, resourceful, and underneath that tough exterior, kind.

Andrew Rader (SpaceX engineer, MIT PhD, author)

Jean-Luc Picard probably has the best balance to leadership and integrity, but James T. Kirk is more flawed, emotional, and relatable in a human sort of way while generally still displaying strong leadership abilities. Overall, I would say Picard is a “better commander”, but James Kirk is more daring, risk-taking, and fun. Commander Adama is an extremely solid choice, balancing tough grit, integrity, and keen intellect, while preserving his humanity: sort of a good balance between Picard and Kirk, I would think.

Nicole Guggliucci (“Noisy astronomer”, blogger, educator, post-doc)

My take on James T. Kirk is that he is the very reason the Prime Directive was invented. If there was even one Kirk in our galaxy, we’d already know about the existence of other alien civilizations! He’s a hot mess.

I love Picard, as he is a truly good captain, but of these choices, my heart goes with Commander Adama (from the reboot BSG). Unlike the cheery Star Trek universe, he is tested in a very dark time and, though he makes harsh decisions at times, he holds up as one of the strongest captains in the fictional universes that I have loved.

I have to put in a shout out to a character who, though not my favorite captain, is the most entertaining to watch. That’s Captain Benjamin Sisko of Deep Space Nine. It feels like he’s just always on the edge of sliding into doing something that would be morally abhorrent to other Star Fleet captains, but he has enough integrity to always hold to the morals of the Federation while realizing that he has to be flexible to manage a station in a difficult situation. He is absolutely my favorite to watch because he is so passionate and even dangerous.

Erin Macdonald (Space Science Speaker, Educator, Consultant)

I would have to go with the Star Trek franchise, but a different captain, Captain Kathryn Janeway. In being flung across the galaxy unexpectedly with no contact to Starfleet and a crew suddenly torn apart from their homes and families, she met every challenge with strength, integrity, and leadership. She had no senior leadership with whom to consult and therefore had to stand by every decision and action she made. She stayed true to who she was, allowed herself to be vulnerable and human while at the same time imparting loyalty and trust among her crew. Some of the best episodes that demonstrate these hard decisions and her leadership include Latent Image, The 37s, and one of my personal favorites, Fair Haven (while a fun holodeck episode, it shows how lonely Captain Janeway is and the constant need to be a leader, not a friend to her crew).

Interplanetary games

According to some counts there are more than 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games. What sports could we play on other objects in our Solar System? Which sports could we modify to accommodate conditions on other worlds (in example lower gravity)?
Fraser Cain (publisher at Universetoday.com, co-host of Astronomy Cast)

The obvious answer is human powered flight, of course, where you strap on a pair of wings and fly around in the low gravity of the Moon or Titan. But actually almost any sport would be fascinating to watch in low gravity environments. Just running would take an enormous amount of skill in lunar gravity, or basketball players making 8 meter jumps to dunk a basketball. Everything would be different in low gravity and totally worth watching for the sheer spectacle.