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With technology advancing so rapidly we’re making big discoveries on a daily basis. What fascinating discovery would you like to hear about when you wake up tomorrow morning? Evidence of life on another planet or a moon, signs of bio-signatures on an exo-planet, reception of a signal from an intelligent life or maybe something completely different?
Andrew Rader (SpaceX engineer, MIT PhD, author)

Wow, those would all be good ones! However, in my view, the main point of searching for life on planets and moons in our solar system is to test the hypothesis “are we alone”? (Because we currently have one world with life, Earth, and a 1 out of 1 scientific result is meaningless due to the anthropic principle, but a 2/2 would be a big deal.) Thus, hearing directly from intelligent extraterrestrials would sort of cut to the chase and be an even bigger deal.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

This one got me thinking. Any discovery that would be a real a paradigm breaker would not be one that I could predict, and I doubt even people much cleverer than I would either.

A couple of helpful quotes to keep in mind:
Clarke’s First Law: “When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.”
J.B.S. Haldane: “Now my own suspicion is that the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.”

My own ability to predict future discoveries is probably even more limited than a distinguished but elderly scientist. We will probably need to rework our conceptual toolbox – our vocabulary, if you will – to even be able to recognize what is right in front of us. I am optimistic that this will happen, since it has happened before, such as when we realized that space and time weren’t absolute, or that the Earth was very ancient and not the center of the universe.

However, your question seems to be about discoveries we can predict, and for me the most important would be the confirmed discovery of life in our solar system (possibly even here on Earth) that we unambiguously do not share a common ancestor with. This “second genesis” would effectively nail down the fourth term in the Drake equation – it’s on the order of one, and implies that life is more or less a natural state of warm matter. This may well happen within my lifetime.

Erin Macdonald (Space Science Speaker, Educator, Consultant)

The near-term big discovery I’m looking forward to (now that we’ve got gravitational waves!) is evidence of life (current or past) in our own solar system. With further exploration of Mars (including underwater lakes) as well as future missions to Europa with a warm, seemingly salt-water ocean under the surface, I hope that we find evidence of even past microbial life on other planets. While all the discoveries in the last decade of exoplanets which may be able to support liquid water on their surface, we seem to have collectively made the assumption that there is other life out there, but we have to remember that we still don’t have any evidence of that. Once that discovery is made, I will be literally jumping for joy.

Brian Koberlein (astrophysicist and physics professor at Rochester Institute of Technology, author, podcaster, publisher)

Honestly, I’m really keen to see a black hole directly. If the rumors are true that should happen April 10. My dissertation was on black holes, and at the time we had no way to directly observe one. To finally see that happen would be really cool.

Bob Novella (co-founder and vice-president of New England Skeptical Society, co-host of Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe)

Beyond all other discoveries, I would probably most enjoy waking up one morning to the news of signals from space from an extra-terrestrial civilization. This could minimally be just a “hello world” signal proving to us finally that these technologically advanced creatures are really out there. That would of course be the news of the century but it would also ultimately be quite frustrating since having a conversation given the distances involved would try anyone’s patience. Ideally, this discovery would take the form of what Isaac Asimov and Carl Sagan described as an Encyclopedia Galactica: a cornucopia of detailed information about the aliens and their culture, science and technology, and surely many things that we can’t imagine or even comprehend.

A fascinating variation of this idea that I’ve often thought about involves the discovery of an extra-terrestrial cloaked satellite that has suddenly revealed itself in orbit around earth.
This satellite would have documented in detail the evolution of life on earth for hundreds of millions of years. Imagine having actual documentation of dinosaurs and proto-humans and countless other extinct life forms that we have never found fossils for.

Ask Me Anything

Extraterrestrial civilization have visited our planet. International community decided that you will be the one to ask our visitors questions. Let’s assume we can communicate freely with our guests. If you could ask only one question, what would it be and why?
Seth Shostak (Senior Astronomer and Director of the Center for SETI Research at SETI Institute)

Do you have music?

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

An alien way of thinking might be very alien indeed, but I will assume they are advanced enough, and possess a sufficiently rich conceptual framework to translate our human meaning. Still, it’s probably best at first to avoid anything too value laden, such as “why are you here?”, “do you want to help us?”, or “do you like my poetry?”. Instead, there are many key facts that they would know that we don’t, and it’s hard to pick just one.

I think I would start with: “is the the first time you have attempted to contact our species?”. That would help set the context, and the answer would drive some of the subsequent questions.

Antonio Paris (Astronaut Candidate, Astronomy Professor, Planetary Scientist, Space Science Author)

The visitation of an extraterrestrial civilization would be marked as one of the most pivotal moments in human history. If I could participate in a welcoming committee or scientific panel to welcome and address out visitors, the question I would ask is why are you visiting Earth?

Andrew Rader (SpaceX engineer, MIT PhD, author)

I would want to know about how their power or propulsion systems worked so we could replicate it. Seems like people who get “abducted by aliens” are always more concerned with strange personal or medical details, but the most important thing would clearly be to learn about the technological fields that evidently brought them here.

Ciro Villa (technologist, application developer, STEM communicator)

Well, if I could, my question would be “Can I ask you more than one question?”….but joking aside, perhaps the question I would ask is: “Why did you come here?”. I think that among the so many questions, this would be one that could help us understand several things including the intentions of these beings (assuming they would not be lying of course) and could give us some hints regarding our own survival (or destruction at their hands).

Where we’re going we don’t need roads

It’s easy to make predictions for 1, 2 or 5 years into the future. Let’s go 50 years into the future to the year 2069. How will life on our planet change by that time? How about our presence in our Solar System? Will we have the technology to consider travelling to another star systems?
Nancy Atkinson (Editor at Universe Today, writer for Seeker and author of “Incredible Stories From Space” and “Apollo 11: Eight Years to the Moon” (coming out in July 2019))

What will the world look like in 50 years? It’s anyone’s guess, as the state of future technology is so hard to predict. I’m guessing we’ll continue our attachment to our phones and computers, so much so that somehow, they’ll become integrated into our clothing as wearables or maybe even our bodies in some fashion. I truly hope the “Star Trek” vision of the future is a possibility, where we can eliminate poverty and live in relative harmony on our planet. As far as space travel, I always have maintained that getting humans to Mars is always ten years off into the future, no matter where we are in time. Hopefully in 50 years, we’re at least closer to the perpetual 10-year plan, but I’m actually not too hopeful. I’m predicting robotic missions will only improve to the point where we’ll have live video feeds from around the Solar System, which might preclude the need for humans to take the risks of traveling in space. The big question mark is our planet’s environment. Do we have the political will, the fortitude and sufficient technological advances to make changes now that will ensure that the air, water and land will continue to sustain humanity into the future? The choice is ours.

Graham Lau (Astrobiologist and Communicator of Science (also known as “The Cosmobiologist”))

I once heard an expert in computer science expound that, while many of us could guess about what might be happening in the world in 5 years, even the best scientists and engineers would often be wrong when asked to guess where we’d be several decades out. That said, here are just a few of my guesses at potential trajectories for our civilization by 2069:

– We’re now seeing effects from anthropogenically-driven climate change happening faster than many of us had previously expected. Intensification of storms and increased variability in the weather will likely continue to be driven by climate. The world will likely continue to heat, even if many nations start making drastic changes to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases. I think by 2069 that these things will have caused a lot more coastal erosion, property damage, dislocation of human populations, the extinction of amphibians and other at-risk species, and increased desertification in equatorial regions. However, I also think there may also be some positive to come from this as well. We may see new forests springing up, rapid speciation driven by organisms migrating into regions that were previously covered in ice most of the year, and increased vegetation coverage in Arctic regions. Along with the environmental costs and potential benefits of climate change, I think by 2069 we’ll see a lot more people globally accepting our role in the Earth system and we’ll see some of the earliest planet-wide efforts for humans to become better stewards of our biosphere.

– Although it would be nice to say that by 2069 we will have human colonies throughout the solar system and maybe even people travelling off to other stars, I don’t personally think this will be the case. I think by 2069, we will have seen the first human explorers on Mars and the beginnings of a Mars colony. I think we’ll have at least one colony on the Moon and many more people living, working, and even recreating in orbit of the Earth. But I think we’ll still be in the earliest steps of exploring our solar system and still preparing for our greater future in space. I think we’ll have sent spacecraft to land on Titan, Europa, and Enceladus by 2069; we’ll have landers operating in the high temperature and pressure environment of Venus; and I think we’ll have sent out at least one, but maybe several, robotic spacecraft intended to explore interstellar space and travel to the nearest star systems to relay data back to us.

– I think by 2069, we’ll have made positive confirmation of signs of life within the atmospheric biosignatures of exoplanets. We currently know of almost 4,000 confirmed exoplanets. By 2069, that number will likely have grown to well over 100,000. Although it is possible that we’re the only show in town, I personally believe that life must be more common in the universe. I think our explorations of the atmospheres of exoplanets has the greatest potential for revealing signs of extraterrestrial life in the coming decades. I think these detections will rapidly change how we view ourselves in the universe and has great implications for advancements in science, technology, philosophy, theology, art, and other facets of human life and culture.

– Medical science has been making amazing advancements over the previous decades and I think the future holds more of the same. By 2069, I think we’ll see genetic medicine, where you walk into a physician’s office, they run your genotype and check your current gene expression and proteins and metabolites, and then recommend a medicine that is tailored directly to you. I think we’ll also see the earliest large steps in advanced human longevity. I wouldn’t be surprised if we see life expectancies jump to 120-150 years for people living in developed nations by 2069. However, I don’t believe that we’ll have yet seen the “singularity” or the advent of an actual “transhuman” by that time. -A final note, a recent issue of the journal Futures has just been released that considers the future trajectory of our species within the context of astrobiology and the search for extraterrestrial life. All of the papers within this special issue are currently available for free (until April, 2019). You can find more information about the issue and links to each chapter here: https://www.bmsis.org/detectability-of-future-earth/

Joe Lennox (Teacher of space science, history and technology and former President of The New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame)

I believe that in 50 years we will have a base on the Moon and another n Mars. I think we will have developed some type f nuclear rocket fuel that will allow us to reach the distant planets with probes / satellites as opposed to human curation. I think Hubble and it’s succeeding space telescopes will discover countless moons and planets and maybe even solar systems that we are not aware of today. I believe we will have a giant leap in medical technology and research due to space based stem cell research and space based 3 D printing. The benefits to humanity will be massive and life changing.

Exceptional character

There were many great characters in the Sci-Fi genre. Which one in your opinion showed the best values like courage, leadership or integrity? Would it be Commander Adama from Battlestar Galactica, James T. Kirk or Jean-Luc Picard from Star Trek or maybe some other exceptional character?
Terry Virts (Speaker, author, consultant, former Astronaut)

There have been many great leaders in science fiction, but I think at the top of that list is Captain Kirk. He was always decisive, usually made the right decision and lead through some pretty terrible adversity. Once you got past some of the overacting drama he actually dealt with a very pressing and important social issues. He had a multi-racial crew which was unheard of at that time and he dealt with it seamlessly, he just accepted his crew for who they were, without even thinking of their race or even species. He dealt with all of the important political tensions of the day, between the US and the Soviet Union, the race riots in America and all kind of problems. The world could’ve really used a real life leader like Captain Kirk. In fact we could probably use him today, without the overacting 🙂

Mike Mongo (Author, astronaut teacher, science communicator)

For my money, there is no better leader in the myriad of science fiction universes than Buckaroo Banzai. In addition to good genes, a talent for conceptual physics, and the superlative focus and nerve of brain surgeons–as well as the moxie to lead a New Jersey bar band–Buckaroo Banzai knows his way around multiple dimensions, interplanetary existential crisis, and even bad puns. But above and beyond all this, there is one quality which makes Buckaroo Banzai a great character is Banzai’s natural good luck. Good luck is the earmark of all exceptional characters from science fiction and Buckaroo Banzai exemplifies it.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

Well, o course Dr. Who comes to mind at once, but one of my favorite protagonists is Terry Pratchett’s Discworld witch, Granny Weatherwax. She is brave, wise, resourceful, and underneath that tough exterior, kind.

Andrew Rader (SpaceX engineer, MIT PhD, author)

Jean-Luc Picard probably has the best balance to leadership and integrity, but James T. Kirk is more flawed, emotional, and relatable in a human sort of way while generally still displaying strong leadership abilities. Overall, I would say Picard is a “better commander”, but James Kirk is more daring, risk-taking, and fun. Commander Adama is an extremely solid choice, balancing tough grit, integrity, and keen intellect, while preserving his humanity: sort of a good balance between Picard and Kirk, I would think.

Nicole Guggliucci (“Noisy astronomer”, blogger, educator, post-doc)

My take on James T. Kirk is that he is the very reason the Prime Directive was invented. If there was even one Kirk in our galaxy, we’d already know about the existence of other alien civilizations! He’s a hot mess.

I love Picard, as he is a truly good captain, but of these choices, my heart goes with Commander Adama (from the reboot BSG). Unlike the cheery Star Trek universe, he is tested in a very dark time and, though he makes harsh decisions at times, he holds up as one of the strongest captains in the fictional universes that I have loved.

I have to put in a shout out to a character who, though not my favorite captain, is the most entertaining to watch. That’s Captain Benjamin Sisko of Deep Space Nine. It feels like he’s just always on the edge of sliding into doing something that would be morally abhorrent to other Star Fleet captains, but he has enough integrity to always hold to the morals of the Federation while realizing that he has to be flexible to manage a station in a difficult situation. He is absolutely my favorite to watch because he is so passionate and even dangerous.

Erin Macdonald (Space Science Speaker, Educator, Consultant)

I would have to go with the Star Trek franchise, but a different captain, Captain Kathryn Janeway. In being flung across the galaxy unexpectedly with no contact to Starfleet and a crew suddenly torn apart from their homes and families, she met every challenge with strength, integrity, and leadership. She had no senior leadership with whom to consult and therefore had to stand by every decision and action she made. She stayed true to who she was, allowed herself to be vulnerable and human while at the same time imparting loyalty and trust among her crew. Some of the best episodes that demonstrate these hard decisions and her leadership include Latent Image, The 37s, and one of my personal favorites, Fair Haven (while a fun holodeck episode, it shows how lonely Captain Janeway is and the constant need to be a leader, not a friend to her crew).

Interplanetary games

According to some counts there are more than 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games. What sports could we play on other objects in our Solar System? Which sports could we modify to accommodate conditions on other worlds (in example lower gravity)?
Fraser Cain (publisher at Universetoday.com, co-host of Astronomy Cast)

The obvious answer is human powered flight, of course, where you strap on a pair of wings and fly around in the low gravity of the Moon or Titan. But actually almost any sport would be fascinating to watch in low gravity environments. Just running would take an enormous amount of skill in lunar gravity, or basketball players making 8 meter jumps to dunk a basketball. Everything would be different in low gravity and totally worth watching for the sheer spectacle.

“The Challenges of the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis of UFO Phenomena” by Antonio Paris

In the past, I often explained that nearly all UFO sightings are misidentified terrestrial objects such as man-made aircraft, weather balloons, and satellites; as well as natural phenomena like meteors, birds, lens flares, and just about anything moving within the electromagnetic spectrum’s visible band.

Moreover, alleged physical evidence such as debris from UFO crashes, burn marks on the ground, or alien implants have all turned out to be quite terrestrial, including elaborate hoaxes. Thus, after decades of research by hundreds of UFO investigators, not one UFO has been unequivocally identified as an extraterrestrial spacecraft in a way required by science and/or common sense. Contrary to what most mainstream ufologists proclaim, there is no physical evidence to support their extraterrestrial hypothesis of UFO phenomena.

Attacking physics and space science, furthermore, is the standard modus operandi I have encountered at UFO gatherings. Rather than presenting incontrovertible evidence to prove their extraterrestrial hypothesis, members of the UFO community attack scientists and skeptics by attempting to expose weaknesses to a counterargument. Such refutation, however, is no substitute for evidentiary support of the extraterrestrial hypothesis for UFO phenomena. It is simply faulty logic to assume that, because a scientist’s or skeptic’s explanations may be flawed, the UFO community’s hypothesis is valid. Another common tactic deployed by the UFO community is to claim that, if science cannot prove that a UFO was not an extraterrestrial spacecraft, one can infer that it is in fact an extraterrestrial spacecraft (e.g., because it was too large or moved faster than conventional aircraft). This kind of reasoning is known as the argumentum ad ignorantiam or the argument from ignorance. A claim does not become true or reasonable if a contrary claim cannot be proved to be true.

The UFO community, unfortunately, has become a cult inundated with New Age claptrap, pseudoscience, cryptozoology and the paranormal. This is why scientists and academicians distance themselves from the UFO community. In addition to false hope from the science-fiction entertainment industry, as well as spectacles found only at large-scale UFO conferences, there are several reasons why the UFO community believes that extraterrestrials are behind UFO phenomena.

Some of these reasons include:
1. Questionable interpretations of visual experiences augmented by pseudoscience such as hypnosis.
2. The testimony of unreliable witnesses.
3. Inability to separate science fiction from science.
4. The inclination to believe people who tell fantastic stories.
5. The naïve belief that all disagreement among sources is part of a worldwide government conspiracy to withhold the truth about UFOs.
6. A desire for contact with beings from another world.
7. A belief that extraterrestrials are interested in the welfare of humanity, which either already is, or eventually will become, part of a preexisting civilization.

Ufology, in short, is now a cult in which belief in extraterrestrials is analogous to belief in the supernatural.

Emotions and Confirmation Bias

Rather than applying science and logic to defend the extraterrestrial hypothesis of UFO phenomena, the UFO community addresses the issue through emotions and confirmation bias. Ufologists have a predisposition to favor information, no matter how fantastic, that confirms their beliefs or assumptions. (1)  They display this bias when they gather or remember information selectively or when they interpret it in a biased way. This inclination is especially prominent at UFO conferences when emotionally charged stories of alleged alien abductions and government conspiracies are presented. Those who support the extraterrestrial hypothesis of UFO phenomena, moreover, tend to interpret ambiguous and anecdotal evidence as supporting their existing position. This is often the result of media sound bites, social media, and UFO organizations’ claims that they are “scientific” entities. When confirmation bias is coupled with pareidolia, apophenia, and illusory correlation, the end result is belief perseverance, which contributes to overconfidence and strengthens beliefs even in the face of contrary evidence.

Lastly, belief in the extraterrestrial hypothesis of UFO phenomena did not develop into self-validating structures all by themselves. They are the direct result of the UFO community leaders’ often modifying and revising their agenda to conform to the prevailing culture of their memberships. A clear example of this occurred when the UFO community was faced with a serious institutional crisis regarding the U.S. government’s explanation for the 1947 Roswell incident. Rather than accepting the proven fact that the UFO was actually a balloon under the auspices of Project Mogul, the UFO community conveniently resorted to claims of a government cover-up.

Ufology Is Not a Science

Science is a systematic enterprise that constructs and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. Ufology, however, is not a science, and no research on or investigation of UFOs has provided a testable explanation and prediction. Nevertheless, there is a growing trend in the UFO community to present ufology as a science and a topic that requires urgent response from the government. Many mainstream ufologists as well as speakers at UFO conferences attempt to use fancy words such as quantum mechanics, which should immediately be considered a red flag. Most ufologists are not scientists and are simply invoking a poorly understood branch of science. Quantum mechanics is the science that deals with matter at the level of atomic and subatomic particles; thus, it cannot be applied to the macroscopic world of large physical objects such as UFOs.

Too often attendees at UFO conferences are perfectly willing to believe the alleged evidence that supposedly proves the UFO hypothesis in their favor, but they steadfastly refuse to consider the overwhelming evidence that contradicts or refutes their claims. In other words, most ufologists cherry-pick the evidence, which is not an allowable option in legitimate science.

Reliability vs. Credibility

Every year hundreds of thousands of reports of unusual sightings and alleged abductions flood the Internet and social media. Organizations such as the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) and National UFO Reporting Center (NUFORC) inundate the UFO community with reports that thousands of UFOs are being documented each month. If only 1% of these sightings were both reliable and credible, it would appear, on the surface, that at the very least thousands of extraterrestrials are visiting planet Earth. That is not the case.

From 2010-2017, I conducted a comprehensive analysis of approximately 10,000 sightings reported to MUFON. The analysis concluded, first, that the vast majority of these sightings were reported by the average person and almost never by professional or amateur astronomers, who are trained observers and spend inordinate amounts of time observing the sky. Second, more than 85% of these reports were incomplete, contained inaccurate and ambiguous information, and were not properly vetted under a systematic control system. The reliability of most of these reports, therefore, was questionable at best. I suspect that if a proper case-control system had been in place and the monthly reporting numbers reflected such a process, perhaps only a few dozen reports per year would be forwarded for investigation. In short, most reports of UFO sightings are unreliable, and the numbers routinely published are deceptive.

From time to time a handful of pilots, military personnel, and police officers did report seeing a UFO. The credibility of these witnesses was taken for granted because of their official titles and/or positions. Unfortunately, however, such reports are too often sensationalized to imply that, because there are no logical explanations for what the officials observed, it must have been an extraterrestrial spacecraft. Regardless of these witnesses’ positions, their reliability can only be established once a thorough Personal Credibility Assessment Investigation on them is completed, which my research found to be rarely conducted.

Challenges for the UFO Community

The UFO craze is now part of a modern subculture. Every year thousands of UFO buffs spend millions of dollars to attend UFO conferences and purchase clothing with pictures of little green men, sensationalistic books, and a variety of UFO paraphernalia. Some U.S. cities even sponsor annual parades, such as that at the Annual Roswell UFO Festival in New Mexico.

In closing, the facts are quite simple. The UFO community’s hypothesis of extraterrestrials is scientifically unsubstantiated conjecture at best. The Observable Universe’s scale, the composition of stars and alleged extraterrestrials’ home planets, the speed of light as applied to interstellar travel, and the hazards of prolonged spaceflight all indicate that technologically advanced, spacefaring civilizations either do not exist, are extinct, or are too far away to detect. That is not to say that other Earth-like planets, or for that matter other planets with complex and/or primitive life, do not exist. Even planets with intelligent life can be common in the universe. Ultimately, however, these assertions are speculation at best because no planets with technologically intelligent life have been detected, yet.

(1) Plous, Scott (1993). The Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making. New York: McGraw-Hill.

My kind of spaceship

You’re about to head for a journey through our Solar System and beyond. What fictional spaceship would you like to board? Would it be Millenium Falcon, Battlestar Galactica, USS Enterprise or something completely different?
Nancy Atkinson (Editor at Universe Today, writer for Seeker and author of “Incredible Stories From Space: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Missions Changing Our View of the Cosmos”)

I would like to travel on board a Nova-class starship, which was a type of Federation starship in Star Trek designed for short-term planetary research missions. Instead of studying other worlds from far-away Earth, why not go visit them and study them in situ? Strange new worlds indeed! I might have to wait a while to do this though, as in Star Trek lore, these type of ships will only be placed in service starting in the late 24th century.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

Based purely on sentiment, it would be Serenity, which strikes me as being in spirit much more like a long range spaceship than luxury liners like the Enterprise. That said, all the science fiction spaceships I’ve come across take considerable liberties with physics, astronomy, or both. Douglas Adams’ Heart of Gold gets around all these bothersome realities by exploiting infinite improbability, but that is more unlikely to come about than a Babel Fish.

One fictional spaceship that minimizes these little white lies is Arthur C. Clarke’s Discovery One from 2001 a Space Odyssey. No magical artificial gravity, impossible propulsion, or unnecessary bulk. Of course, you would never get out of the solar system with such a craft.

In the far future, I would envision relatively small interplanetary craft powered by small black holes, with the shielding problems largely solved to allow travel at large fractions of the speed of light. There would be biological organisms aboard such a craft (apart from some hitchhiking bacteria), just uploaded minds that construct for themselves a new, properly adaptive body upon arrival at a destination. Daniel Cartin’s simulations show that you could build a network of colonies in the local solar neighborhood with an 11 parsec range, which seems just doable to a 21st century engineer.

Ciro Villa (technologist, application developer, STEM communicator)

“The Avalon” of the movie “Passengers” is absolutely breathtaking. I wouldn’t mind cruising the Galaxy on that one.

Fraser Cain (publisher at Universetoday.com, co-host of Astronomy Cast)

Personally, I’ve always preferred the Stargate method of travel, using wormholes to voyage from world to world. What could be more convenient and civilized than to walk through a Einstein-Rosen Bridge and arrive at your destination. That’s the only way to go.

Seth Shostak (Senior Astronomer and Director of the Center for SETI Research at SETI Institute)

Enterprise, of course. I like the never-iron uniforms.

Bob Novella (co-founder and vice-president of New England Skeptical Society, co-host of Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe)

Many spaceships in science fiction would do a fine job touring our solar system. Using their Warp or Hyper or U-Space drives, they could visit all planets and even the Oort Cloud a light year away between breakfast and lunch, assuming you preferred just a 3 hour tour 🙂

For the deluxe tour, though, I’d have to take advantage of Time and Relative Dimension in Space, otherwise known as the TARDIS from Dr. Who. This wonderful vessel could of course flit between planets faster than any other vessel… more importantly though, it could turn each planetary visit into a tour de force of our solar system’s evolution.

You could visit each planet and see it evolve from its birth billions of years ago all the way to its ultimate demise: burned to a crisp as the sun dies, dismantled and used as a Dyson swarm component, or if it survives all that, you could discover if it crashes into the sun due to the loss of gravitational wave energy in a quintillion or sextillion years.

When the the tour is done, you could then choose to return a nanosecond after you left. I can’t think of any other ship in science fiction that could do so much in so little objective time (except maybe the Heart of Gold, but I wouldn’t want to see any whales crashing into planets)

Destination: Mars

Mars will become a touristic destination in a matter of 20 years. At what price for a round trip would you consider buying a ticket? What safety concerns would have to be met to sway you over?
Ciro Villa (technologist, application developer, STEM communicator)

First and foremost, whether Mars will become a tourist destination in the next 20 years or not, it’s still to be seen and subject to debate. There are still several critical hurdles to be overcome: financial, technical and societal just to name some of the main ones. As of today, these hurdles make just the prospect of humans traveling, let alone landing and settling on the red planet all but trivial and extremely challenging. Initially when human travel to the Red planet will begin, only trained astronauts will venture and embark in the journey that will no doubt be filled with difficulties and perils.

When and if we will finally be able to achieve tourism to Mars, prices will at the beginning undoubtedly be highly prohibitive and most likely out of reach for a large swat of the human population. I personally would most likely not be able to afford the journey in my lifetime. It is indeed hard to place a fair price tags with so many unknowns still in place.

If we let our fantasy go wild, then I would envision that in another 100 to 150-year technology will have advanced to the point to allow for “affordable” and safe commutes with round trips to Mars. I frankly still don’t know what exactly that price tag might or should be.

In terms of safety, it is also almost impossible to pinpoint what would be an acceptable threshold of risk metrics that would make me comfortable enough to embark in the journey with a relative degree of confidence that my trip would not be the last of my life. As mentioned in the beginning, obstacles to be overcome in terms of human planetary travel survivability still abound and only after several iterations, including discoveries, advancement in science and technology and lesson learned, would I believe that a journey to the Red Planet might be safe and enjoyable.

Fraser Cain (publisher at Universetoday.com, co-host of Astronomy Cast)

I’m probably less adventurous than most people. I really love Earth, and I’ve barely explored this amazing planet and all it offers. I’d want to know that a trip to and from Mars is relatively safe and much much quicker before I was willing to make that journey. I’d do a few months on Mars to see some of the highlights and then I’d like to come home. I would like to experience lower gravity, but that would be even better on the Moon, which is only a few days away.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

I’ve little doubt that the first tourist tickets to Mars will only be affordable by the wealthy or those able to obtain corporate sponsorship. The cheaper option is likely to be one way ticket, but still far beyond the means of all but a few of us. An optimistic price for a one way ticket in the early days is probably $5 million USD, but it’s probably much more than that until Mars travel is far more efficient than it is now. Perhaps I could raise enough for a one way ticket, which I would have to consider if my health holds up long enough. A few million dollars, for the price of wearing corporate logos on my flight suit, might be possible for me.

I don’t expect Mars travel to be as safe as getting on a cruise ship or an airliner for a long time to come. We can probably find efficient ways to address such threats as infectious diseases in a closed space, radiation exposure, or social meltdowns, so that the biggest risks are launch and landing. We shouldn’t get into the same mentality we had in the early days of the Space Shuttle, with a delusional notion of how safe it is. After the Challenger tragedy in 1986, there was no shortage of astronaut candidates. Some people are willing to take risks if the reward is there. Many people have died leaping off of cliffs in a wingsuit, or climbing high peaks – not because they don’t know what the risks are, but because they accept them and proceed nonetheless. We may never lose as many Mars tourists as the 290 people who have died climbing Everest, but it does seem that some will meet their destiny there. Those who fear the risks should stay on Earth, where they will also die when their time comes.

If I could choose, I’d choose to die on another planet.

Nancy Atkinson (Senior Editor for Universe Today, Host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast & a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador)

Ah yes, this is what I jokingly call “The Mars Plan,” where getting to Mars is a thing that is always 20 years off into the future, no matter when. Humans on Mars was touted as being 20 years away in the 1970’s and it is still 20 years away today. Are we actually any closer now to accomplishing this great feat than we were in the 1970’s? I’m not very confident that we are. There are still many technical hurdles to leap, like making the trip shorter than 7 months, being able to land large payloads on Mars, and developing habitats and life support systems that are truly foolproof. If someone dies on the first human mission to Mars, that will be the end of it. Also, this is going to cost a lot of money, and there will have to be a payoff in some fashion, whether it is mining, tourism or an Earth-catastrophe management endeavor.

As a journalist, I’m secretly hoping that someone will pay *me* to go to Mars so I can write about it! Otherwise, I don’t think I’ll ever have enough cash to do it on my own.

Episode 1 – Science Outreach

In our first episode I was joined by Mike Simmons and Andrew Rader to talk about science outreach and challenges it faces.

To infinity and beyond!

Elon Musk has sent his cherry Tesla Roadster on a Falcon Heavy maiden flight. If it was up to you, what would you send as a payload on that flight and where would it be going?
Mike Simmons (Founder and CEO of “Astronomers without Borders”)

What would I send as a payload? Me! Driving a Tesla roadster would be good but it seems to offer little protection.

Seriously, the payload wouldn’t have made any difference on the test flight. No one was going to risk a valuable scientific payload on an unproven rocket, especially when the builder says it has only a 50% chance of success. I think the proof of concept for the Falcon Heavy’s ability was quite successful.

At first it seemed more than frivolous to send his car into orbit around the Sun. But after seeing the images sent back from it and looking at the attention it got I really like it. The launch is an incredible feat and this quirky way of doing it was just mind-bending. Something different in an era where rocket launches and satellites are becoming routine.

Nancy Atkinson (Senior Editor for Universe Today, Host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast & a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador)

I would have loved for SpaceX to include student experiments or some payload chosen by young people. I think that would have been the most altruistic, educational and scientific choice. But if I understand the story correctly, SpaceX had asked NASA and the US Air Force if they were interested in sending a scientific payload, free of charge on the Falcon Heavy. And while I’m not sure about the timing, but I’m betting there was a delay in a response from NASA and the Air Force, and after the answer was no, that left SpaceX to choose something fairly quickly. There may not have been time to develop something like a competition for student experiments. But the live video feed of the Tesla Roadster in orbit of Earth may have been one of the most exciting, inspirational and just plain cool things that kids have seen lately in regards to space exploration, so perhaps the Tesla was the perfect choice.

Paul Carr (Space Systems engineer at NASA, podcaster, blogger, investigator)

I am amused and disappointed at all the noise over Elon Musk’s choice of a dummy payload – his own car. I thought it was very touching and completely appropriate (full disclosure, I am a Tesla shareholder).

It is impossible to tell payload provider before a demonstration launch that their satellite is not at high risk on an unproven rocket. Throughout the long process leading up to the launch, SpaceX had been managing expectations. They have a history of failing early and learning from it. They felt they had all the known unknowns under control, but in a complex system, it is the unknown unknowns that can easily cause a disaster. I have no doubt that SpaceX approached, or were approached by, a a number of entities about having their payload on the demo flight, but all had to accept the risk. It is easy (and lazy) to say that a scientific payload should have flown, but only in hindsight is this possible, and so the word “should” has to be replaced with “could”. As it is, I think Starman was a master stroke of public relations that no one will forget for a long time. The “Don’t Panic!” sign on the dashboard made it perfect for me. I believe Douglas Adams would have been delighted to see that.

If I had about $20 million sitting around idle, and had been approached by SpaceX, I would have offered an infrared telescope to be positioned at one of the Earth-Moon Lagrange points (probably L1, most of the way to the moon from the Earth) to look for temporary moons. These are small asteroids that are captured into the Earth-Moon system, stay for a few orbits, and then get flung back out into the solar system. At present, we discover them pretty much by luck, if int all. A more systematic survey would provide a more accurate census of these objects, and other Near Earth objects as well. Flying all the way to a Lagrange point before the injection burn might have been a strain on the rocket’s batteries, but will put that in the bucket of solvable engineering problems. The relight of the upper stage after a days long cruise would be an even better demo than what they got.

My ultimate goal would be to have a squadron of probes ready to shoot out after the temporary moons, and intercept and rendezvous with them to ascertain their mineralogy and ore-bearing potential at close distance. This would be more elaborate and expensive, but the first baby step of a telescope to detect the moons might be worth risking on a demo mission.

Antonio Paris (Astronaut Candidate, Astronomy Professor, Planetary Scientist, Space Science Author)

If I had the opportunity to select the payload for the Falcon Heavy test flight, I would have to admit that the rocket would not be powerful enough. The rocket would have been loaded with an assortment of trinkets that represented all of humanity, such as music and photos from diverse cultures. Now do not get me wrong – a Telsa Roadster is pretty cool. However, a sport car does not represent humanity in a nutshell, but rather it only represented Elon Musk and a select class of citizens most of us will never hold membership in.